Meet Guest Author Sarah E. Smith…

Originally posted on thestoryreadingapeblog.com

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

sarah-e-smithHi I’m Sarah and when I was at school I was the “thick, lazy, gobby kid” teachers despaired of and sent out of the room. Constantly the new girl, I knew within two years I wouldn’t be at the school anymore. So: I just couldn’t be bovvered to fit in, or make friends.

If Sarah was a noun phrase it would mean: couldn’t organise her way out of a wet paper bag. The amount of HW I didn’t do would fill the Albert Hall. I couldn’t spell to save my life. I didn’t know what a comma or a full stop did, which drove my English teacher mad because I was reading Dumas, Machiavelli, Christie, and Bronte. I could devour a book in hours and yet I couldn’t understand the basics of punctuation.

To make things worse, I constantly lost things. Couldn’t remember what lessons I had, or what…

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By MoreThanACat Posted in Fiction

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From one of my other blogs

Sarah E Smith

This came up on Amazon today from one Holly J Sanderson.

I thought I’d put it on here for you to have a look 🙂

Latest 5* review from Amazon

Another exciting trip through history that had a couple of “huh???” Moments in their too, bonus points for local references that were bang up to date and easily recognisable (I’m 99.9% sure I recognised a couple of the present day character references too!!) A real page Turner that ended on a hell of a cliff hanger …..

A personal note to the wonderful author: you can’t leave it like that!!! We demand another!

Everyone else: get reading, it’s fabulous! (And watch out for flapjacks)

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By MoreThanACat Posted in Fiction

Lucy’s Admiral

To coincide with the publication of the 1949 Affair, The History they Tried To Suppress has asked me to reblog an entry from Mark Birch’s blog – Modern Day Pepys – in the hopes that if it’s here, it will be visible to all. (It doesn’t show up on his blog – unless you access it from their offices apparently). So here goes…

From Mark Birch: Modern Day Pepys

Thoughts on Lucy’s Admiral…

Don’t get me wrong, Lucy’s my mate. We’ve known each other since the first day of primary school and I’ve really despaired at the way all the so called popular kids have picked on her over the years. They call her geeky. In my book that’s jealous for clever so and so who gets good marks and does her homework. Well what’s wrong with that? Luce was always confident that the only way you got off Canvey and stayed off was by getting good grades, going to college and all that stuff. That of course was before that day trip to Southend Pier!

Now we’re off Canvey for good! And although I ain’t said nuffin’ to Luce, I’m pretty sure we aren’t ever going to get back to our world. Well in our reality: Lloyd George died in a carriage accident in 1909. In the world we’ve ended up in, he became the Great War Prime  Minister and key force at Versailles in 1919. So I’m pretty much guessing that even if we could get back to Southend and 2013 – it sure ain’t going to be the one we left. No surree bob as my grannie used to say! Still I’m not sure that’s a bad thing!

This time travel lark’s altered us too. There’s me – hob nobbing with politicians, and spies and the likes – getting beaten up like I’m some kind of young James Bond or that Biggles bloke and you’ve got to admit, even with the black eyes – being a real life adventurer’s got to beat being 18 and doing a college course. And then  there’s her – gone from geeky to gorgeous faster than you can say – Aldwych Strand.

I know what you’re going to say: I’m jealous. No I’m not. Nor do I fancy her. Luce is my mate.

But I’d be lying if I said I liked  all this attention she’s getting: and from all these “players”.  Lloyd George, Marconi, Walter Nicolai. Least they was respecting her. This admiral? This Valentin bloke? He’s like an octopus. Or at least he would be if he touched her. And he don’t; which if you asks me is weird. Oh it’s not he don’t touch her: he don’t touch anyone! Not without his gloves on.  But  what I don’t like is the way his eyes follow her around a room. And he stands just close enough to let the whole world know she’s his. Of course she’s too naive to see what he’s up to. She’s says he’s just being kind and an … avuncular.

Oh Luce get a grip!

This bloke sure ain’t no Hercule Poirot.

He’s hiding something and it’s going to all end in tears one of these days – you mark my words.

Why do I say that? Simple.  There’s more to this admiral of hers than meets the eye. Apart from being a murdering, lying scumbag nazi? O heck yes. She can’t see it though. I can. I’ve seen his handy work at first hand. I’ve seen him kill.

But what I really don’t like it the way this guy  knows too much – about her, me; our world (the one we’ve come from, I mean). He knows about things a bloke from the early twentieth century shouldn’t. And every time you asks him to do something – to help out; he says it’s more than his job’s worth. There’s also the way he commands a room. Now I’ve watched Hitler on those film clips, and I’ve seen how he can hold a crowd in the palm of his hand. But this Valentin bloke. He really knows what power is. Like he’s ruled the world or something.

Still no doubt it’ll all sort itself out. When we leave 1949 and head off for our next adventure. He’ll just be a memory, and time will have returned to normal. Because if it doesn’t…

 

 

What has Lucy got herself into this time?

“– although all the men you meet in this time zone will lie to you, only Mark will betray you.”

***

The 1949 Affair is here – out on kindle ahead of its paperback release Monday…

 

Mark was hoping to go home. Not that home was up to much; but it was a bit more stable than jumping around in time. Unfortunately someone or something had other ideas. You see, he and Lucy are back on a pier – only it’s not Southend, nor is it 2013. It’s 1949 and the the Second World War hasn’t gone according to the way the teenagers remember it from history lessons.

The truism of every alternative time line and every scifi writer  is a reality. The Nazis won the war in 1940 and are in control. To survive, the friends are going to need their wits about them. But that’s easier to say than do! Hitler knows about the time travellers and he has issued a very specific order: when they are found they are to be executed immediately.

While you don’t have to have to have read End of the Pier Affair to enjoy this new installment of Lucy and Mark’s time travelling adventure, it won’t hurt you know…

 

Published to coincide with the UK summer holidays, The 1949 Affair is the second book in the Aldwych Stand Trilogy, which will conclude next year with the Cut Throat Alley Affair.

(need the US link? Click here)

The 1949 Affair – Ask me a question

Hi guys: Lucy and Mark’s 1949 affair 1 paper back  versionnext adventure is out next week. If you have any questions about their previous adventure – The End of the Pier Affair – or their latest travels in the 1949 Affair: post them below and I’ll do my best to answer them…

If you don’t fancy posting here and are a member of goodreads, you can post your question there 🙂

 

Look forward to hearing from you

Character Profile: Mordecai Gold

Meet another player in the Symington Byrd mysteries: Mordecai Gold, a man who “dances on the edge of the criminal world.”

Mordy (as he is known to his friends) runs a jewelers -come- pawnbrokers. He is a hard nosed businessman, with an eye for a bargain.

But I didn’t want him to be the stereotypical Jew of literature. When Walter Scott created Isaac of York he made him an extreme – the complete antithesis of his beautiful daughter Rebecca; while both George Du Maurier and Dickens created wholly evil criminal masterminds – who looked and acted in an immediately identifiable caricature.

There’s far more to Mordy than that. Tall, white haired – grandfatherly – this is a man who will admit to being 50 but not a day older. Having escaped the pogroms of Eastern Europe, Mordy  made his home in Whitechapel. Using his connections Mordy has built up a reputation as an honest criminal.  He is the soul of discretion  who (trusted by the highest born and the lowliest of beggars)  will ensure the best deal is achieved for all (though obviously the house will always win). But you cross him at your peril. Fail to keep your word and retribution is swift.

A man who always has sweets in his pockets, Mordy is at the centre of his community: respected, loved and feared in equal measure

When he first encounters Emily, the lonely little girl who spends at least ten minutes of her walk home from school staring into his shop window, Mordy sees an outsider – just like himself: a mystery inside an enigma. After her father’s death, when her mother brings trinkets to pawn to pay for the funeral, Mordy finds himself  being wrapped around the finger of a 7 year old girl who has wisdom beyond her years and an innate ability to identify rough diamonds. Intrigued  and sensing there is more to Emily and her mother than meets the eye, Mordy makes her mother  an offer  that will ensure that as Emily grows up she becomes the Pawnbroker’s apprentice.

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The Problem with Dressing Gowns!

I have made a decision, my  gentleman detective  needs a dressing gown.

Well, you’d have thought I’d have asked the Pope to change religion!

You see,  if I wanted an Arthur Dent style dressing gown, I’d have been fine. Not only could I have sourced one for Symington at the start of the 20th century, but I could get one for OH from Ebay…

 

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But a man’s dressing gown? Very limited stock indeed from which to choose.

See  what I mean?

Now Symington is a man of taste, suaveness and sophistication. I can’t see him in any of the above.

 

Well possibly the last one but in black and gold…