Branching Out

Lucy and Mark’s adventures are nearing their end as I begin the research for the final tale. Provisionally titled the Cut Throat Alley Affair and set in the summer of 1888, our heroes (once again) have to stop the Armstrong Brothers from Killing Lloyd George. But this time there is a greater danger – Jack the Ripper is after Lucy.

And as this trilogy draws to a close, I started to think about the blog. What do I do with it? Where does it go next?

Because, I think I have caught this writing bug – big time.

You see,  Mark and Lucy are not the only characters gossiping away inside my head. Symington Byrd a gentleman detective from the Golden Age of Crime Fiction is joined by a plucky east end side kick, Emily Davies;  and they are regaling me  with murders and puzzles galore. Not only do they have three books of their own to fill, but the research for their world needs to go somewhere.

Thus, the revamp. I hope you like it. As always it’s a work in progress, so do let me know if you think there’s anything I can add/change/ do.

 

1949 Affair

 

As I were going up the stairs

I met a man – who shouldn’t be there!

He shouldn’t be there again today,

I wish I wish, he’d go away!

Well, finally Lucy and Mark’s second adventure is with the publisher…

I worry – will he like it?

How much will he chop from it? What will he say needs changing?

Oh well – only time will tell 🙂

 

Catch up with Lucy and Mark’s first adventure  by clicking here

Post without a title. Further musings from: The 1949 Affair

I’ve been having quite a lot of problems with this book. One scene has been bugging me, causing me sleepless nights. And the difficult thing to explain is that it’s a scene that’s never going to be published. You see, while it’s relevant to the characters; it’s not relevant to the story.

Lucy is falling in love with the enigmatic Von Schmidt. It was always on the cards; indeed some might say from the moment he tells her they’re husband and wife, it was a forgone conclusion. She wants to take it further – well when you’re 18 hormones take over –  but he seems reluctant, determined to remain her avuncular. He has his reasons. And at this point in the tale, he does not want them revealed.

But Lucy has stopped functioning. She refuses to cooperate with the re-writes, explain how she found out about the second entrance to the underground facility.

Something has to be sorted out between the two. But how to do it?

What to say?

And how as an author to hint and yet not show, nor even tell?

 

Perhaps, if Mark had been around and not a prisoner, there would have been a different solution. But Lucy has no best friend in which to confide her woes. She can’t  ask the Madman of Leytonstone, and she can’t even ask Frances Stephenson ( a woman who should know how to go about these things) because Frances is dead.

 

Help comes from an unlikely source. Two throw away lines – chapters apart; and honour is satisfied.

🙂

The Perils of Making your Book Audio

 

My Uncle Bernard is nearly 80 and nearly blind, which means the copy of The End of the Pier Affair I sent him for Christmas will sit upon the shelf unread. So: we had a cunning plan; we would record a copy for him.  It doesn’t need to be studio quality. I’m not selling it. So… download Audacity, commandeer Dad’s microphone, and we’re ready for business. What could possibly go wrong?

Mother!

That’s what keeps going wrong!

The amount of takes we’ve had to do because she interrupts, asks questions; sneezes and coughs!

You can quite see why Hitchcock preferred closed sets!